• strict warning: Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/views.module on line 1118.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_field::query() should be compatible with views_handler::query($group_by = false) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_field.inc on line 0.
  • strict warning: Declaration of content_handler_field::element_type() should be compatible with views_handler_field::element_type($none_supported = false, $default_empty = false, $inline = false) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/cck/includes/views/handlers/content_handler_field.inc on line 0.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_argument::options_validate() should be compatible with views_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_argument.inc on line 0.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_argument::query() should be compatible with views_handler::query($group_by = false) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_argument.inc on line 0.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_sort::options_validate() should be compatible with views_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_sort.inc on line 165.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_sort::options_submit() should be compatible with views_handler::options_submit($form, &$form_state) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_sort.inc on line 165.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_sort::query() should be compatible with views_handler::query($group_by = false) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_sort.inc on line 165.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_validate() should be compatible with views_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 0.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::query() should be compatible with views_handler::query($group_by = false) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 0.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_area::query() should be compatible with views_handler::query($group_by = false) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_area.inc on line 81.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_area_text::options_submit() should be compatible with views_handler::options_submit($form, &$form_state) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_area_text.inc on line 121.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_query::options_submit() should be compatible with views_plugin::options_submit($form, &$form_state) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_query.inc on line 0.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_row::options_validate() should be compatible with views_plugin::options_validate(&$form, &$form_state) in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_row.inc on line 0.
  • strict warning: Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically in /home/lacollecq/www/sites/all/modules/views/views.module on line 1118.

COLLECTIONS

Boucharouite

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Alma :: 1350€ :: 210cm X 170cm :: coton
Alma

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Bahar :: 1700€ :: 200cm x 125cm :: coton
Bahar

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Basra :: 1350€ :: 140cm x 110cm :: coton
Basra

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Bawasir :: 3300€ :: 230cm x 120cm :: coton
Bawasir

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Bouchra :: 350€ :: 170cm x 110cm :: :: coton
Bouchra

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Delal :: 350€ :: 160cm x 130cm :: :: Coton - fibres synthétiques
Delal

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Douja :: 750 € :: 225cm x 160cm :: :: Coton - fibres synthétiques
Douja

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Dour :: 350€ :: 100cm x 100cm :: coton
Dour

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Fatna :: 1550€ :: 160cm x 110cm :: coton
Fatna

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Fayrouz :: 3550€ :: 259cm x 130cm :: coton
Fayrouz

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Founoun :: 750€ :: 150cm x 130cm :: coton
Founoun

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Haya :: 1450€ :: 190cm x 140cm :: coton
Haya

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Kahila :: 350€ :: 180cm x 140cm :: coton
Kahila

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Lamia :: 1750 :: 170cm x 150cm :: coton
Lamia

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Lekbira :: 350€ :: 290cm x 90cm :: Coton - fibres synthétiques
Lekbira

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Loujaïne :: 1800€ :: 200cm x 160cm :: coton
Loujaïne

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Louma :: 1950€ :: 190cm x 150cm :: :: coton - laine -fibres synthétiques
Louma

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Marjane :: 1400€ :: 220cm x 150cm :: :: coton
Marjane

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Minjad :: 750€ :: 220cm x 130cm :: :: coton
Minjad

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Nadra :: 350€ :: 160cm x 110cm :: coton
Nadra

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Nira :: 1450 € :: 170cm x 110cm :: :: Coton - fibres synthétiques
Nira

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Noufayssa :: 2500€ :: 210cm x 150cm :: coton
Noufayssa

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Ouichah :: 2650€ :: 315cm x 140cm :: :: coton
Ouichah

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Raneda :: 350€ :: 160cm x 110cm :: :: coton - fibres synthétiques
Raneda

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Rayda :: 750€ ;; 240cm x 120cm :: :: Coton - fibres synthétiques
   Rayda

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Souad :: 3850€ :: 290cm x 160cm :: :: coton
Souad

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Tarifa

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Touma :: 1650€ :: 150cm x 100cm :: :: coton
Touma

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Touria :: 1900€ :: 350cm x 120cm :: :: coton
Touria

The “Boucharouite”, carpet made of bits of cloth, owes its apparition to that of prêt‐à-porter clothes in the most remote villages of Morocco almost fifty years ago. Used around the world, the technique consists of cutting fine strips of fabric and knot them one by one on the weft of the loom, an instrument, which can be found in most households. Exclusively created by women, these carpets escape the codes and communal signs which govern the patterns of traditional carpets; this make them very personal creations, even though the loom – a social gathering point and a place to exchange and transmit the values of the community – invites some occasional input from neighbours on the piece being created. The “economic” factor – the cotton and synthetic fibres used, being far cheaper than wool – largely contributed to the widespread adoption of the “Boucharouites” across the whole country, while at the same time creating a strong connotation of a “poor man’s carpet”.

Zoumourroud :: 350€ :: 160cm x 110cm:: :: Coton - fibres synthétiques
Zoumourroud